John Perkins[1]

Male 1590 - 1654  (64 years)


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  • Name John Perkins 
    Born 1590  Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 26 Sep 1654  Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I21  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 9 Mar 2007 

    Father Henry Perkins,   b. 20 Dec 1571, Hillmorton, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Dec 1629, Essex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Sawbridge,   b. Abt 1596,   d. 1639, Ipswich, Mass Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 43 years) 
    Family ID F20  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Judith Gator,   b. Abt 19 Mar 1587/8, Hillmorton, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 9 Oct 1608  Hillmorton, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Elizabeth Perkins,   b. 1611, Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 18 Sep 1670, Salisbury, Ma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years)
     2. Sargent Jacob Perkins,   b. 12 Sep 1624, Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 1700  (Age 75 years)
    Last Modified 18 Jun 2018 
    Family ID F21  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 


    • from http://www.maui.net/~mauifun/perkins.htm

      Pierre de Morlaix living 1380
      Agnes Taylor
      |
      Henry Pierrekin
      unknown
      |
      John Parkyns 1397-1400
      unknown
      |
      WilliamParkyns Lord of Ufton living 1427
      Margaret Collee
      |
      Thomas Perkins living 1452-1479
      Ellen Tompkins (sister of John Tompkins)
      |
      William Perkins 1430-1495
      Joanna Reed b 1434
      |
      Thomas Perkins will dated Apri 3, 1528
      Alys de Astley b 1475
      |
      Henry Perkins will proved June 16, 1546
      unknown
      |
      Thomas Perkins b 1510 d 1591/2
      Alice Kebble b by 1555 living Dec 17, 1601 dAug. 20, 1613
      |
      Henry Perkins
      Elizabeth Sawbridge
      |
      John Perkins
      Judith Gator

      Estate of John Perkins, Sr. of Ipswich
      Essex Probate Docket # 21337

      28th of ye first mo called March, 1654.
      I John Perkins the elder of Ipswich being at this tyme sick and weake in body yet through the mercy and goodness of the Lord retaining my understanding and memory: doe thus dispose of and bequeath my temporall estate as Followeth.
      First. I do give and bequeath unto my eldest sonn John Perkins a foale of my young mare being now with foale if it please the Lord she foale it well also I give and bequeath to my sonn John's two sonnes John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heyfers: also I give and bequeath to my son Thomas Perkins one cow and one heyfer also I give and bequeath to his son John Perkins one ewe and to be delivered for his use at the next shearing time also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Sargent one cow and an heyfer to be to her and her children after her decease as it may please ye Lord they may increase, the proffits or increase to be equally devided amongst the sayde children: also I do give to my daughter Mary Bradbury one cow and one heyfer or a young steere to remain to her and to her children in theyr increase or proffits as it shall please the Lord to bless them and to be equaly devided to ye children: also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Lidia Bennitt one cow and one heyfer or steere to be equaly devided to her children in theyr increase or proffits after her decease; I doe also give unto my grandchilde Thomas Bradbury one ewe to be sett apart for his use at ye next shearing tyme: also I do give and bequeathe unto my sonn Jacob Perkins my dwelling house together with all the outhowseing and all my landes of one kinde and other together with all improvements thereupon to be his in full possession according to a former covenant after the decease of my wyfe and nott before and so to remaine to him and to his heires forever; all the rest of my estate of one kinde and other
      I do wholy leave my deare wife Judith Perkins apointing and ordaining my sade wyfe the sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament Desiring my sayde wife to dispose of the cattell above mentioned according to her discresion as they shall prove steeres or heyfers, also to dispose of some of the increase of the sheep to ye children of my sonn Thomas and of my three daughters at the Discresion of my sayde wife and this I doe ordaine as my Last will and Testament subscribed with my own hand this twenty eight day of ye first month 1654.
      John Perkins (signed)

      Signed in presence of
      William Barthomew
      Thomas Harris

      Proved in court held at Ipswich 27 (7) 1654 by the oath of William Bartholmew and Thomas Harris per me
      Robert Lord, cleric

      Source: "The Family of John Perkins of Ipswich, Massachusetts", by Geo. A. Perkins, M.D., Salem, 1882

      John Perkins and his wife Judith Gator from Hillmorton in Warwickshire sailed from Bristol on December 1, 1630. There were 60 people on the ship named the LYON, one of them was Roger Williams. Accompanying them on this voyage were their six children; John, Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, Thomas and Jacob. The records of Hillmorton contain the records of John Perkins' baptism, marriage and the births of his six children in the Shirehall in Warwick.
      On the 18th of May, 1631, John Perkins took the oath of freeman, admitting him to all the civil rights of Massachusetts Bay Colony. Church membership was a requisite for being made a freeman and only freemen were allowed to vote. Applicants for admission into the church-membership had to satisfy the elders and then the whole congregation of "the work of grace upon their soules... that they are true beleevers(sic) and that they finde their hearts drawn to beleeve in Christ Jesus" according to Thomas Lechford. He moved from Boston in 1633 to the town at Ipswich(Agawam), founded by John Winthrop,Jr., the son of the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. January 17th, 1633 "The Court of Assistants order, that a plantation be commenced at Agawam, lest an enemy finding it, should posses and take it from us. April 3, 1634 Governor Wiknthrop went to Agawam to see his son and the new settlement. Enough people went there that by August 4, 1634, Agawam was renamed Ipswich. By 1635, there were 4,000 people in the Bay Colony.
      "At a meeting houlden in November it was consented and agreed unto the length of Ipswich should extend west ward unto the buryinge place and Eastward unto a Cove of the River unto the plantings ground of John Pirkings the Elder." Thus begins the Town Record, written in the month of November, 1634. John Perkins, Sen. enjoys the distinction of being the first man, whose name appears in the Record. In Ipswich, the first meeting house was where now stands the First Congregational Church. There was no church yard, so a burying ground was established some distance away. There was erected a stone wall around the meeting house 5-6 feet high. John Perkins was largely engaged in agriculture, It is no small compliment to Mr. Perkins that an order was adopted in 1634: "Whosoever will have his lott entered into the records of the Towne shall bring unto the officer in that behalf a certificate under the hands of Henry Short, John Pirkins, Robbert Mussey, John Gadge or the greatest pt of them which shall bee a warrant unto the officer in that beehalf to enter and record the same." These lot layers were busy men and very important functionaries in those days. Settlers were concerned with the bounds of land and lot-layers measured the land to tenths of inches. They had extraordinary powers, none were allowed to sell their lot to a newcomer without permission from the lot-layers.
      John was already comfortably established in his home on the corner of East Street on the way to Jeffrey's Neck. Though the entry of the grant was not made until 1635, he had already received an allottment of ten acres, upon part whereof he hath built a house, six acres of meadow, six acres of upland joining his house lot, and forty acres of land in "Cheboky". The word, lot, for a piece of land was derived from the Puritan practice of assigning land by lot to insure fairness.
      In the Ipswich book of Land Grants or "Commoner's Records", we find the following: 1635. Granted John Perkins Senior 3 acres of upland 10 of meadow lying toward the head of Chebacco Creek, also a little island called More's point, this island contains by measurement 30 acres, and upon it is now seen the cellar of a house. John was a Deputy of the General Court in 1636. Meadow in England meant grassland annually cut for hay, the colonists called this mowing ground and called fertile land for crops, meadows. The island was purchased in 1882 by a namesake and descendant of John Perkins, who is a shoe manufacturer in Ipswich. It is owned today by Van Edward Perkins of Melrose, Massachusetts, a direct descendant of John Perkins, Jr.
      Here is a copy of the will of John Perkins Senior. March 28, 1654.
      "I, John Perkins, the elder of Ipswich being at this tyme sick and weake in body, yet, throught the mercy and goodness of the Lord, retaining my understanding and memory, doe thus dispose and bequeath my temporall estate as followeth.
      First I do give and bequeath to my eldest sonne John Perkins a foale of my young mare, being now with foale, if it please the Lord she foale it well. Also I give and bequeath to my sonn John's two sonns, John and Abraham, to each of them , one of my yearling heyfers. Also I give and bvequeath to my sonn Thomas Perkins one cow and one heyfer. Also I give and bequeath to his sonn John Perkins one yew and to be delivered for his use at the next shearing tyme.
      Also I doe give and beqveath to my daughter Elizabeth Sargeant, one cow and an heyfer, to be to her and her children after her decease, as it may please the Lord they may increase : the proffits, or increase to be equally divided amongst sayde children.
      Also I doe give to my daughter Anna Bradbery one cow and one heyfer, or a young steere, to remaine to her and to her children in theyr increase or proffits, as it shall please the Lord to bless them, and to be equally divided to thier children.
      Also I doe give and bequeath to my daughter Lydia Bennett one cow and one heyfer or steere to be equally divided to her children in theyre increase or profits after her decease.
      I doe also give to my grandchild Thomas Bradbery, one ewe to be sett apart for his use at ye next shearing tyme.
      Also I doe give and bequeath unto my sonn Jacob Perkins my dwelling house together with all the outhousing and all my lands on one kind and other together with all improvement thereupon to be his in full possession, according to a former covenant, after the decease of my wife, and nott before, and so to remaine to him and his heirs forever. All the rest of my estate of one kinde and other I do wholly leave to my deer wife Judith Perkins, apointing and ordaining my sayde wiffe to dispose of the cattel above mentioned according to her discretion as they shall prove steers or heyfers, as also to dispose of some of the increase of the sheep to ye children of my sonne Thomas and of my three daughters at the discretion of sayde wyfe. And this I doe ordain as my last will and testament, subscribed with mine own hand this twenty-eight day of the first month 1654.
      John S house was located at what is 80 East Street today, only the floor and cellar survived the fire of 1668 when it was Jacob Perkins home. John Perkins' silver headed walking cane is now in the Whipple House in Ipswich. Besides holding town offices and occupying other positions of trust, he was on the original board of government for Ipswich along with John Winthrop, Mr. Bradstreet, Mr. Denison, Goodman Scott, John Gage and Mr. Wade. These were the original "seven pillars" of the new community.

      ! (1) "Genealogical Sketches of the Woodbury Family," by Charles Levi Woodbury (John B. Clarke Co., Manchester, NH, 1904) p.96,150. Cites: (a) Essex Hist. and Ge. Col., 19.
      (2) "New England Historical & Genealogical Register," Vol. 94, Oct 1940, "Memoirs of William Huntington Perkins", p.385-386.
      (3) "The Pioneers of Massachusetts," by Charles Henry Pope (Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1969) p.354. Cites: (a) New Eng. Hist. & Gen. Reg., Vol. X, 211-216.
      (4) "Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts," by David W. Hoyt (New England History Press, Somersworth, NH, 1981, reprint of publications 1897 to 1919) p.281-282. Cites: (a) NEHGS Register (1885), p.291. (b) "Merrill's History of Amesbury," p.102.
      (5) "The Hammatt Papers, Early Inhabitants of Ipswich, Massachusetts 1633-1700," by Abraham Hammatt (Reprint 1880-1899. Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1980) p.244-245.
      (6) Dr. C.E. Hyatt, Joliet, IL. Cites: (a) Perkin Family in Ye Olden Times, p.78-79. (b) Dawes & Allied Families, by Mary Walton Ferre, p.484.





      (7) "Burke's American Families with British Ancestry" (Genealogical Pub. Co., Baltimore, 1977) p.2863.
      (8) Ancestral File, FHL, 1995.
      (9) "The Great Migration Begins - Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, " by Robert Charles Anderson (NEHGS, Boston, MA, 1995) 3:1431-1433. Cites: (a) "The Records of the First Church in Boston, 1630-1868," Publications of the Colonial Soc. of MA, ed. Richard D. Pierce (Boston, 1961) p.14. (b) "Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England," 1628-1686, ed. Nathaniel B. Shurtleff (Boston, 1853-1854) 1:94,102,103,174,366. (c) "Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex Co., MA," 1636-1686 (Salem, 1911-1975) 1:37,145,187,260. (d) "The Ancestry of Dudley Wildes, 1759-1820, of Topsfield, MA," by Walter Goodwin Davis (Portland, ME, 1959) p.81-90. (e) Ipswich, MA Land Records 3:1; 4:268. (f) "The Probate Records of the Essex Co., MA," 1635-1681 (Salem, 1916-1920; rpt. Newburyport, MA, 1988) 1:190-191.

      ! Birth: (1,4) c.1590. (1) Newent, Gloucestershire, England. (2) Hillmorton, Warwick Co., England. (2,9d) s/o Henry Perkins/Elizabeth Sawbridge. (5,9) Age 64 at death in 1654 (b. 1590). (6) s/o Henry Perkins/Elizabeth __. (7) s/o Henry Perkins. (9c) Above 60 years old on 26 Mar 1650 (b. 1590 or before). (9d) Possibly a close relative of Isaac PERKINS of Ipswich, MA.
      Baptism: (2,6,7,9d) 23 Dec 1583, Hillmorton, Warwick Co., England.
      Marriage to Judith Gater: (1) (2,6,7) 9 Oct 1608. (2) England. (6,7, 9d) Judith Gater. (9d) 8 Oct 1608, Hillmorton, Warwickshire.
      Death: (1,4,7,9) 1654. (2,6,9) Ipswich, MA. (3,4,5) Will dtd 28 Mar (1st mo.) 1654. (4) Estate proved 26 or 27 Sep, 1654. (5) Proved 26 7th mo. 1654. (6) 26 Sep 1654. (8) 23 Sep 1654. (9) Will dtd 28 Mar 1654, probate dtd 26 Sep 1654.
      Burial (8) 26 Sep 1654.

      (7,9) Of Hillmorton, Co. Warwick, England.
      (5) He is usually referred to as The Elder on the records, and called himself Elder in his will.
      (1,2,4) 1630, 1 Dec: He brought his family to Massachusetts in the ship "Lyon", sailing from Bristol, England. (4) With Roger WILLIAMS. (9) Came to New England on the first trip of the "Lyon" in 1631.
      (1,7) 1631, 5 Feb: Arrived in Boston, MA.
      (4) Lived in Boston 2 years. (9) Settled at Boston.
      (3) 1631: (3,9a) John PERKINS and Judith his wife admitted to the Boston church. (9a) They were members #107 and #108, which would be as early as 1631.
      (1,3,5,9b) 1631, 18 May: Elected a Freeman of the Bay Corporation, Boston.
      (9b) 1632, 3 Apr: (1) 1632: The General Court granted him the exclusive privilege of taking wild fowl with the net at Pullyn's Point, later Shirley, MA, and forbade all from shooting there. (9b) A Court of Assistants ordered that "no person whatsoever shall shoot at fowl upon Pullen Poynte or Noddle's Ikeland, but that the said places shall be preserved for John PERKINS to take fowl with nets."
      (9b) 1632, 7 Nov: (1,3,9b) One of four commissioners appointed to fix the boundaries between Dorchester and Roxbury.
      (9b) 1633, 1 Apr: In a list of men authorized by the court to begin the settlement of Ipswich, the 8th name is William PERKINS. (9) The name of William must be an error for John PERKINS, inasmuch as William PERKINS was at Roxbury at this time, and would not move to Essex Co. for nearly 2 decades more.
      (1,2,4,9) 1633: Moved to Ipswich, Essex Co., MA. (1,2) Was one of a party with John WINTHROP, Jr., which settled Ipswich with the object of checking the inroads of the Tarratine Indians and the French. He had various land grants here. (4) Owned "Perkins Island" in Ipswich River. (7) Of Ipswich, MA. (2) Was a farmer in Ipswich.
      (5,9d) 1634: (5) "Giuen and granted unto John PERKINS, the Elder, forty acres of land more or less, bounded on the East by Mr. Robert COLES, his land; on the South by a small creek; in the west unto the Town side." This tract was later known as Manning's Neck, Ipswich. (9d) Granted 40 acres in Ipswich, MA. (3) 1634: Was a proprietor in Ipswich.
      (9d) 1635: Was granted 6 acres of upland in Ipswich.
      (9d) 1636: Was granted 40 acres at Chebacco.
      (9b) 1636, 25 May: (1,3,4,7,9b) Represented Ipswich as deputy to the General Court.
      (3) Was a town officer.
      (5) 1637: Sold 40 acres granted to him in 1634 to Thomas HOWLETT for 7 pounds, 20.
      (9d) 1639: Was granted 6 acres of plowland, Ipswich, MA.
      (9d) He had Ipswich land grants of 3 acres of upland, 10 acres of meadow, an island at More's Point, 10 acres where "he hath built a house," 6 acres of meadow.
      (5) 1641: Commoner of Ipswich, MA..
      (9c) 1641, 28 Dec: Served on the Essex grand jury.
      (9e) 1644, 10 Dec: John PERKINS of Ipswich in America and Thomas PERKINS exchanged land in Ipswich.
      (9c) 1648, 26 Sep: (1,9c) Served on the Essex grand jury.
      (9c) 1650, 26 Mar: (1,3) 1651: Was relieved from military duty and training.
      (9c) "John PERKINS Sr., being above sixty years old, is freed from ordinary training."
      (9c) 1652, 28 Sep: Served on the Essex grand jury.
      (5,9f) 1654, 28 Mar: John PERKINES the Elder of Ipswich wrote his will. (9f) States that "at this time sick and weak in body." (5,9b) Left eldest son John PERKINES "a foal of my young mare, being now with foal, if it please the Lord to foal it well," and a ewe. Left to son John's two sons John and Abraham to each of them one of my yearling heifers. Left to son Thomas PERKINES a cow and heifer, and to his son John PERKINES one ewe. Left to daughter Elizabeth SARJEANT and her children a cow and heifer. (5) Left to daughter Anna BRADBURY and her children a cow and a heifer or young steer. (9b) Daughter named is Mary BRADBERY. (5,9b) Left to daughter Lidia BENNITT a cow and a heifer or steer, "to be equally divided to her children." Gave to my grandchild Thomas BRADBERY one ewe. Left son Jacob PERKINES my "dwelling house, together with all ye out houses, with all my lands of every kind, and according to a former instrument, after the decease of my wife and not before." Left rest of estate to wife Judith PERKINES, who is named sole executrix, "as also to dispose of some of the increase to children of my son Thomas and of my three daughters" at her discretion. Witnesses William BARTHOLEMEW, Thomas HARRIS. (9f) Made his mark to his will.
      (9f) 1654, 26 Sep: Will proved.
      (5) Inventory of his estate lists dwelling house and land and out houses, 40 pounds; land about the house about 8 acres, 12 pounds; about 14 acres of land, 21 pounds; about 40 acres of marsh, 20 pounds; one mare with a mare foal, 25 pounds; 6 milk cows, 30 pounds; 4 yearling heifers and a steer, 11 pounds 10. Other effects making a total of 250 pounds, 5. (9f) The inventory of John PERKINS was undated but totaled 250.5.0, including real estate valued at 132 pounds: the dwelling house and barn with out housing, 40.50 (sic); the land about the house about 8 acres, 12 pounds; "more land unbroke up" about 14 acres, 21 pounds; "a parcel of marsh about six acres," 12 pounds; "a parcel of upland and marsh being much broken about twenty acres," 20 pounds; 12 acres of improved land, 24 pounds.
      (4a,b) Sources name daughter Judith, who m. William SARGENT, and d. c.1633 or later. Hoyt was unable to verify this from any original sources.



  • Sources 
    1. [S1] Imported GEDCOM file.