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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 Source (S1659)
 
2 1 CAUS Burned at the stake
2 SOUR S1615 
ROGERS, Reverend John 'The Martyr' . (I90573)
 
3 1 NAME Noel /Symar/
2 GIVN Noel
2 SURN Symar

GEORGE JOLIVETAbbot Jean-Paul_Mederic Tremblay, author of a biohraphy of Noel Simard dit Lombrette, entitled Contemporain du Grand Roi, told me: perhaps one day we will have proof that Pierre, the ancestors father, came here before his son Noel.

Raymond Gariepy, a great researcher and expert on the history of the Beaupre coast, states, with the help of the Archives of the Seminaire of Quebec, that Pierre Simard dit Lombrette received his concession from Jean de Lauzon,senior, the Governor of New France, on 30 January 1655, at the same time as Robert Pare and Mathurin Meusnier, his neighbors. Therefore Le Lombrette, which means the little shadow, arrived in New France before 1655.

Pierre returned to France on 28 May 1657 to witness the marriage contract of his nephew Jacques Simard. Pierre returned to Canada the same year as proved by a transaction on 24 July 1657 between Etienne Lessard and Pierre Lombrette, master mason, and signed at Quebec before notary Audouart. From the summer of 1657 to the autumn of 1659, the civil and religious registries are silent on the subject of Pierre. There is no reference to son Noel, Did Pierre return a second time to France to convince his son to accompany him? Or had he come alone to join him? On 17 August 1659, Noel Simard stood before Father Pagueneau as the god-father of Marguerite Meusnier, at the Lessard house; this is the first indiction of his presence on the Beaupre coast.

Pierre Simard, son of Marsault Simard and of Oxanne Soullet or Goulet, grandson of Marsault and of Leonarde Berthoulme married before 1588, great-grandson of Antoine Simard and of Francoise Gerthon, had a brother with the first name of Marsault, an ox plowman; a sister, Marguerite, wife of Pierre Gellibert.

Secular roots attach the Simard family to the soil of Anjou, more precisely at Puymoyen, the small native village of Pierre and Noel. Puymoyen, today a commune in the department of Charente, arrondissement and canton of Angouleme, was formerly a village situated 6 kilometers from Angouleme . In the space of 40 years, 93 people form Anjou came to enrich the human assets of the Canadians in the XVIIth century. Most of them were quarrymen at Puymoyen.

Pierre Simard, born about 1602 or 1603 according to the censuses, entered into a marriage of short duration, at Angouleme with Catherine Boudier on 25 May 1631. On 2 December 1635, Pierre promised to accept as his second wife, Suzanne Durand, daughter of the late Louis and the late Francoise Levrauld, from Angouleme . Pierre and Suzanne had 2 children: Noel, born about 1637, and Suzanne.

Suzanne Durand, wife of Pierre and mother of Noel, did not go to Canada. When she had her will drawn up on 27 October 1666, Suznne considered herself a widow. She gave all her property to Marie Baurye wife of Pierre Pinasseau, a tailor, where she was living. The reasons for this marital separation still remain unknown. The following hypothesis has been put forth: Suzanne Durand went of Canada with Pierre before 1655; she returned to France and never wanted to go back...We can assume anything when history is silent...

On Sunday, 13 November 1661, notary Audouart made his way to Sainte-Anne du Petit-Cap, nearby the Riviere aux Chiens, to the house of Etienne Racine and Marguerite Martin. The Racine parents were favorably disposed to give their 15 year old daughter, Marie-Magdeleine, in marriage to the 24 year old Noel Simard.

The Martin grandparents and uncle Jean Cloutier were already waiting to support ancestor Racine. Pierre Gilbouin, Claude Poulin and Robert Pare were ranged on the Simard side. Father Pierre Simard took advantage of the opportunity to recompense the prospective bridegroom, recorded as follows;

having regard because his said son helped him by his own work made and put in good condition the concession where he was living and which he worked all his youth.

Pierre then made a gift to his son of all that he owned including house, barn, animals and furniture, but he reserved for himsilf half of it for use during his lifetime. Noel then agreed to lend 300 livres to his sister Suzanne if she came to live in this country.

In their turn, the Racines gave presents to their daughter with a value of 119 livres. Pierre drew his mark, Noel signed, the notary initialed, and the deed was done.

The following Sunday, 20 November 1661, at Chateau-Richer, Abbot Thomas Morel published the banns of marriage between Noel Simard, laborer, and Marie-Madeleine Racine, dispensing with the next two banns. On Tuesday of the same week, at the same church, the same priest said the nuptial benediction. As the unfinished church of Sainte- Anne was not suitable for the ceremony, Abbot Morel held forth a Chateau- Richer.

For a number of years, Noel and his wife worked hard at Sainte-Anne where they cleared the forest and and watched their family grow up. In 1667, the Simards owned 13 arpents of cultivated land and 4 head of cattle. But in 1681, they accumulated 30 cleared arpents, 20 head of cattle and 3 guns.

On 6 January 1666,Etienne Bellinier dit Le Prince decided to make a voyage to France. Before notary Auber, he entrusted the care of his property, some land to the East of Petit-Cap, to Pierre Simard, his trusted friend., Bellinier returned to Canada and took control of his property again. In 1667, Pierre Givouin, a master mason like Pierre Simard, wanted to end his days in France, his native land. Noel, his wife, and the patriarch Pierre Simard, bought this land for 1500 silver livres to be paid in three installments. It measured 3 arpents in width and had been worked since 1655. But Gibvouin delayed his departure and continued to work at his trade here for 10 more years. However, in the autumn of 1677, the master mason finally decided to return to the land of his fathers and he needed his money. He agreed that Pierre and Noel Simard would be released by paying him 750 livres, half of it immediately. The agreement was recorded before
notary Duquet on 22 October 1677. On the same day, Msgr de Laval reimbursed the complete sum due to Gibouin., Noel Simard and his wife, without any mention of father Pierre, committed themselves to repay this sum to the generous lender.

INTENDANT
The Seigneur Bishop had just recognized in Noel Simard a conscientious man possessing a sense for business and the love of work. Abbot Pierre de Francheville, administrator of the Seminary and representative of Msgr de Laval, contacted Noel Simard dit Lombrette in the autumn of 1677, to offer him a contract to care for the Seminary properties at Baie Saint- Paul for 5 years; a sort of sinecure for that era. There were 2 oxen, 6 cows, 2 sows and a male pig to feed, buildings to maintain, lands to plow, ditches to dig, fences to put up. The profits and losses would be shared equally. Noel must make 1000 pine planks for which he would be paid 27 livres per hundred and 30 lvres for timbers. As for salmon fishing, half of the nets salt and barrels would be furnished by the lessor. The contract became effective on Easter 1678 and remained in force until Easter 1683. In short, a well-detailed lease, favorable to Simard, on the condition that he have a sure head on his shoulders, plenty of courage and a propensity for hard work.

Noel kept his property at Sainte-Anne and left his family there for some time. There were boys at home to help their mother, under the direction of the grandfather. In the census of 1681, did the officials add the Simard property at Sainte-Anne to that of Baie Saint-Paul? For those times, 20 head of cattle were considerable.

Before seeing this founding family move eastward from Sainte- Anne, let us say that it had left a very precise mark in the parish. The registries of the receipts and expenses of the church of Petit- Cap, even incomplete, note the name of Pierre Simard at least 12 times. His paternal authority appeared very strong. Pierre paid his tithe and regularly made gifts to the church. He worked on the construction of the second edifice from 1661 to 1662 and received a salary of 55 livres. On three occasions, it is difficult to say if, under the name of Lombrette, was hidden the person of Pierre or Noel. One time only we read: in addition given to Nouel Lombrette 12 livres in 1679. Had Noel worked on the building of the third church inaugurated in 1678?...

PETITE-VIERE-SAINT-FRANCOIS
Noel Simard faithfully fulfilled his contract for the Seminary. Like Pierre Tremblay, Pierre Laforest, Claude Bouchard and Rene Lavoie, he obtained a concession at Cap-Millard at the Petite-Riviere-Saint-Francois. His family must have moved there in the summer of 1680, since Rosalie Simard was born near Baie Saint-Paul on 13 November 1680 and was baptized the following spring on 2 May 1681.

Patriarch Pierre Simard died after 1681; this is all that we can state. In 1686, he was no longer alive. Noel Simard then bought at least 4 pieces of land at the Petite- Riviere, which he distributed to his sons.

FAMILY TREE
The Simard family was composed of 14 children in the first generation: 8 boys and 6 girls. The first 4 were baptized at Chateau Richer; the following 4 at Sainte-Anne; the other 6 at Baie St- Paul.

1. Pierre, born on 30 April 1663, was the god-son of his grandfather and husband of Claire Dodier. He inherited the ancestral land at Sainte-Anne where he was buried on 7 November1724.

2. Noel, the god-son of Noel Racine on 8 October 1664, married Anne Dodier at Baie Saint-Paul on 26 April 1689. He lived at the Petite-Riviere where he died in 1726.

3. Marie-Madeleine, god_daughter of Pierre Gibouin, was married at Sainte- Anne on 3 Noember 1683 to Pierre Tremblay, junior, the future Seigneur of the Eboulements. Alas! This little Simard was the first of the family to die in Canada. At the age of 17 she died in her first childbirth and was brought from the Petite-Riviere to the cemetery at Sainte-Anne on 24 August 1684. Her son Pierre survived her.

4. As for Etienne dit Lombret, he was working at his grandfather Racine's home in 1681. He maried Rosalie Bouchard on 22 November 1695 and settled at Petite-Riviere where he died at the age of 81.

5. The first Simard child to be baptized at Sainte-Anne was Francoise, on 11 November 1671. Francoise Lehoux, wife of Robert Pare acted as her god-mother. Francoise was married to Jean Allaire at Baie Saint-Paul, and then to Noel Boucher.

6. Joseph, baptized by Abbot Francois Fillion on 11 February 1674, lived at Sainte-Anne where he was married to Gertrude Caron, then to Marie Boivin. On 27 October 1697, he inherited the land that his grandfather had bought from Pierre Gibouin in 1667.

7. Augustin, born in 1676, became the husband of Marguerite Pare and also lived at Sainte-Anne. He even owned a concession at Saint-Fereol which the Intendant Hocquart took away from him on 24 May 1738 because he had failed to cultivate it.

8. The last child to be born at Sainte-Anne was Francois, on 22 September 1678. He married Ursule Pare, daughter of Noel Pare from Saint- Joachim. They raised 9 children at St-Paul.

9. Rosalie was the first child recorded in the registry of baptisms at the parish of Baie Saint- Paul by the Abbot Paul Gagnon, son of ancestor Pierre Gagnon. The god-daughter of Louise Gagne and the wife of Claude Bouchard, Rosalie one day became the companion of Jean Caron and gave him 5 daughters and 2 sons. She was buried on 20 July 1714 at Sainte- Anne.

10. The god-father of Paul Simard was ancestor Pierre Tremblay. Paul married Genevieve Gagnon in 1716. In the year of his marriage he agreed to care for his elderly mother Madeleine Racine in his home. Paul died prematurely, claims Archange Godvour, and was buried on 17 August 1733 at Petite- Riviere.

11. Francois Bouchard, a Captain in the Militia, married Marguerite Simard on 15 June 1699. They had 17 children.

12. Jean, husband of Genevieve Gravel, inherited lands at Petite- Riviere from his brothers Francois and Paul; he died after a few months of marriage. His son born posthumously founded a family.

13. Marie-Madeleine, who was baptized in 1689 and died at the age of 80, was married to Antoine Bouchard.

14. Finally, Catherine, the wife of Noel Castonguay, died in 1748 at the age of 56 years.

Such is the history, very brief but so rich in life, of the 14 Simard children, the first branches on the trunk of a giant tree. The third generation numbered 122 grand-children; a mini-parish!

Ancestor Simard knew that work was a treasure. He gave an example of it during 54 years of marriage.

In 1715, Noel Simard fell ill and died in the presence of his wife and children on 24 July, two days before the feast of Sainte- Anne . The weeping family carried his body to Baie Saint-Paul. Abbot Charles Glandelet, dean of the Cathedral of Quebec, passing through Baie Saint-Paul, presided at the funeral. In order to assure peace and justice, the family gathered the following summer to take part in a legal inventory signed by Barthelemy Verreau. It was there that we discover deeds, papers and a host of objects: an axe, a sheepskin coat, a gun which fired with a nasty kick, a long saw, a cross saw , a barrel for salting eels, a tobacco pouch, and old rain hat, etc., Noel was a plowman, carpenter, sawyer, eel fisherman, perhaps a cobbler, and a tinsmith with a reserve supply of 15 poungs of tin.

After 11 years of widowhood and suffering the loss of 5 of her children at the age of 81, ancestress Madeleine Racine went to rejoin her missing family in the summer of 1726. Her grateful descendants will never forget her.

The heirs of the Simard name--Simard means a famous victory--have spread the length of the country and even beyond its boundaries. We find them in every trade and in every profession,. One of the first great Simards from the past was George-Honore Simard (1817-1873), businessman and politician in the city of Quebec. In Charlevoix county, the Simards are still a multitude. One cannot walk the streets of Baie-Saint-Paul today without being struck by this fact.

source: OUR FRENCH CANADIAN ANCESTORS BY THOMAS J. LAFOREST

GEDCOM line 14732 not recognizable or too long:
() 2 GIVN Noel

GEDCOM line 14733 not recognizable or too long:
() 2 SURN Simard 
Simard, Noel (I101615)
 
4 1 NAME Pierre /Simart/
2 GIVN Pierre
2 SURN Simart 
Simard, Pierre (I101600)
 
5 1 NOTE John Fletcher of Milford was the father of Mary Fletcher whomarried Thomas Steevens.

Bailey Family History, Paul Johnson Slate, Essex Mailings,Newark, NJ, May 1952
Pg 124, Para 2

Steevens Family Genealogy dated 1906, Charlotte Steevens Holmesof Elmira


GEDCOM from TimNenno database at www.rootsweb.com. 
Fletcher, John (I36105)
 
6 1 NOTE John Stephens was born in England and married to a woman withthe given name Mary. About 1646 he emigrated to America withhis wife and their three youngest children. They had fourchildren with Thomas being the second oldest child.

Bailey Family History, Paul Johnson Slate, Essex Mailings,Newark, NJ, May 1952
Pg 124, Para 1


GEDCOM from TimNenno database at www.rootsweb.com. 
Steevens, John (I36106)
 
7 1 NOTE Thomas Steevens was born in England about 1628. He married MaryFletcher in 1650 who was the daughter of John Fletcher ofMilford. For religious reasons, he moved to Killingworth, CT in1665 where he became a freeman in 1669. He died
18 Nov 1685. He and his wife had thirteen children of whomJonathan was the
youngest child.

Bailey Family History, Paul Johnson Slate, Essex Mailings,Newark, NJ, May 1952
Pg 124, Para 2


GEDCOM from TimNenno database at www.rootsweb.com. 
Steevens, Thomas (I36103)
 
8 1 NOTE Was living 14 Jun 1426.

Katherine inherited the right to bear her father's arms. Herfather being Sir Thomas Peverell. Both of Sir Hugh Peverell'stwo sons were already dead. The sons being sir Thomas Peverelland Sir John Peverell. This made an armeriguous heiress out ofKatherine Peverell.
2 SOUR S1585 
PEVERELL, Katherine (I90503)
 
9 1 TYPE Book
1 DATE 1986
1 COPR 1986 by Ancestry Incorporated 
Source (S1202)
 
10 1 TYPE Book
1 DATE 1986
1 COPR 1986 by Ancestry Incorporated 
Source (S1671)
 
11 1 TYPE Book
1 DATE 1992 
Source (S1670)
 
12 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE Gilbert Holcomb.ged
1 LOCA The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 50 E. North Temple St., Salt Lake City, UT 84150 
Source (S1669)
 
13 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE Peverell of Royal Descent
1 URL http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~royalancestors/
1 OWNR Marj Gisi and Hallie June Peavey 
Source (S1662)
 
14 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE Woodworth
1 SUBM Bruce Woodworth - Bruce Woodworth@home.com 
Source (S1195)
 
15 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE Woodworth
1 SUBM Bruce Woodworth - Bruce Woodworth@home.com 
Source (S1663)
 
16 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE www.Familysearch.org 
Source (S1190)
 
17 1 TYPE GEDCOM File
1 FILE www.Familysearch.org 
Source (S1658)
 
18 1 TYPE Web Site
1 URL http://www.familysearch.com/Eng/Search/Igi/old_individual_record.asp?recid=93320800
1 DATE 12/2001 
Source (S1661)
 
19 1 _SUBQ Jetté
1 _BIBL Jetté 
Source (S2061)
 
20 2 _PREF Y

CHAN31 Oct 2005

2 _SDATE 1 JAN 1644 
Family F48130
 
21 2 _PREF Y

CHAN31 Oct 2005

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_FREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_MREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_FREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_MREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_FREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_MREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_FREL Natural

Line in Record @F02184@ (MN 11658) from GEDCOM file not recognized:
_MREL Natural 
Family F48149
 
22 2 _PREF Y

CHAN31 Oct 2005 
Family F48178
 
23




1 NOTE a.k.a. Elsa Hollaway.


GEDCOM from TimNenno database at www.rootsweb.com. 
Hollaway, Elsa (I34389)
 
24







I received a number of corrections and additional information in anE-mail on Dec 9 1999 from LeRoy Valyou in Maine(abacus-colonel@prodigy.net) and wish to thank him very much for that asa lot of the descendants and information would not have been easilycorrected or obtained otherwise. His kindness is appreciated.....TomEdworthy 
Valliere, Louis^ (I23095)
 
25







I received a number of corrections and additional information in anE-mail on Dec 9 1999 from LeRoy Valyou in Maine(abacus-colonel@prodigy.net) and wish to thank him very much for that asa lot of the descendants and information would not have been easilycorrected or obtained otherwise. His kindness is appreciated.....TomEdworthy 
Valliere, Louis^ (I48573)
 
26







One of the first Canadian twins 
Gravel, Marguerite (I23159)
 
27







One of the first Canadian twins 
Gravel, Marguerite (I48642)
 
28







Pierre arrived in New Franceas a farmer. He disappeared about 3 monthsbefore Anne had her last child by him, who she named Pierre. 
Valliere, Pierre (I23094)
 
29







Pierre arrived in New Franceas a farmer. He disappeared about 3 monthsbefore Anne had her last child by him, who she named Pierre. 
Valliere, Pierre (I48572)
 
30







[bertrand.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 32 (Disk #2), Ed. 1, Tree #0143, Date of Import: Oct2, 1999]

Occupation: " Meuinier " (Miller). 
Letourneau, David.^ (I48654)
 
31







[bertrand.FTW]

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 32 (Disk #2), Ed. 1, Tree #0143, Date of Import: Oct2, 1999]

Occupation: " Meuinier " (Miller). 
Letourneau, David.^ (I23170)
 
32






Probate records of the District of New London containthe following entry:

"July 5, 1705 Distribution ordered of Estate of John Stark." From this record we learn that he left a widow Elizabeth and his 2 daughters. His widow Elizabeth remarried John Wicks in September 20, 1705. He served in King Philip's War and is included in the list of volunteers in that war that was created around 1701. In this list, he is shown as 'deceased'. This date is somewhat inconsistent with the date of death included in this report. John was a deacon of Elder Stephen Gorton's Church. They appear to have been Baptists. 
Stark, John (I3449)
 
33






Probate records of the District of New London containthe following entry:

"July 5, 1705 Distribution ordered of Estate of John Stark." From this record we learn that he left a widow Elizabeth and his 2 daughters. His widow Elizabeth remarried John Wicks in September 20, 1705. He served in King Philip's War and is included in the list of volunteers in that war that was created around 1701. In this list, he is shown as 'deceased'. This date is somewhat inconsistent with the date of death included in this report. John was a deacon of Elder Stephen Gorton's Church. They appear to have been Baptists. 
Stark, John (I4236)
 
34





 
Bird, Richard (I357)
 
35





 
Mitchell, Joanne (I23080)
 
36





Alias: Lord of Annandale

Notes from Sally Walmsley [Geniedash@bigpond.com]:
Much of what has been written about Bruce is misleading. In addition to
his being Earl of Carrick, Lord of Annandale and Keeper of the Royal
Forests of Scotland, Bruce was, Lord of the Manor of Huntingdon, owned a





town house in London and a suburban manor in Tottenham. Two years before
the rising, his brother Alexander took his Massachusetts. at Cambridge.





Bruce was no wild Scottish chieftain, but an educated noble of Flemish
extraction.
In 1306, the titular King of Scotland was John Baliol, a 'lamb among
wolves' who had achieved the throne through the backing of Edward of
England and John Comyn of Badenoch, head of the most powerful family in





Scotland at that time. Baliol had fled to France with no intention of
returning, leaving Scotland virtually kingless. Bruce had seemingly
started planning his rising in 1304, but everything hinged upon the
support of John Comyn, a difficult person: the Red comyn must either
support Bruce or be dead. The climax came in 1306, when Bruce met the
Comyn in Greyfriars church in Dumfries. As they stood before the alter





and argued, knives were drawn, and John Comyn fell wounded. According to
legend, Bruce ran out of the church crying 'I doubt I have slain the Red
Comyn'. Kilpatrick answered his "Do you so doubt Then I'll mak siccar',
and rushed into the church followed by Sir Robert Boyd and finished the





job. Legendary as this may be, the fact is that both John Comyn of
Badenoch and Sir Robert Comyn were both killed. This was the signal for
Bruce's uprising to start. Bruce first went to his castle at Lochmaben,
and then to Glasgown to secure the Clyde for his supplies from Ireland.





Sir Robert Boyd took Rothesay castle from the sea, and laid siege to
Inverkip. Six weeks after the Comyn's death, Bruce was crowned King of





Scotland at Scone.
Robert Bruce's reign was soon in trouble. Three months after he was
crowned, he was defeated by the English at Methven, and again near
Tyndrum, and had to go into hiding, his queen and daughter sent with the
ladies of his supporters to Kildrummy castle in the charge of the earl of
Athol, Alexander Lindsay and Sir Robert Boyd. The following year the
king returned. Douglas and Sir Robert Boyd led the attack on Arran from
Kintrye, but their attack on Turnberry castle, Bruce's own castle,
failed. Bruce then raised his standard at Loch Trocl in Galloway, where
he defeated an English force sent to capture him. He marched north to
defeat the English at Loudoun Hill, defeated John Comyn Earl of Buchan,





at BarrsHill, and subdued the Earl of Ross. In c1308, Parliament was
called at St Andrews and re-affirmed Bruce as King. During the next few
years, Bruce consolidated his position, capturing all the English-held
castles except Stirling, and repulsing an expedition of Edward II of
England in 1310. The climax came in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn,





where Sir Robert Boyd was one of his principle commanders. 'Blind Harry'
wrote of this battle:-
Ranged on the right the Southron legions stood,
And on this right the fiery Edward Bruce,
With him the experienced Boyd devides the sway,
Sent by the King to guide him through the day.

Between 1307 and 1313, Robert Bruce was able to subdue Inverness, Dundee,
and Perth, thus securing the entire region north of the Tay River, and to
begin attacking the center of English power in lothian; and Edward [II],
faced with financial crisis and growing political dissension at home, was
unable to contain him. The greatest problem facing the king [Edward II] after his reconciliation with [Thomas] Lancaster was the steady advance of Robert Bruce who by March, 1314, had secured the strategic castle of Roxburgh and Edinburgh and even attacked Berwick itself. His main objective was Stirling, the last remaining English stronghold north of the Tweed, but Edward was determined to retain it at all costs.
--- Michael Altschul, + A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314 + , Baltimore MD (The Johns Hopkins Press) 1965, p 159-164 passim

Between 1307 and 1313, Robert Bruce was able to subdue Inverness, Dundee,
and Perth, thus securing the entire region north of the Tay River, and to
begin attacking the center of English power in lothian; and Edward [II],
faced with financial crisis and growing political dissension at home, was
unable to contain him. The greatest problem facing the king [Edward II] after his reconcilia tion with [Thomas] Lancaster was the steady advance of Robert Bruce who by March, 1314, had s ecured the strategic castle of Roxburgh and Edinburgh and even attacked Berwick itself. His m ain objective was Stirling, the last remaining English stronghold north of the Tweed, but Edw ard was determined to retain it at all costs.
--- Michael Altschul, + A Baronial Family in Medieval England: The Clares, 1217-1314 + , Baltim ore MD (The Johns Hopkins Press) 1965, p 159-164





. Robert "the Bruce" de Bruce I was born on 11 Jul 1274 in Ayrshire, Scotland. He died on 7 J un 1329 in Cardross, Dumbartonshire, Scotland. He was buried in Dunfermlin Abbey, Fifeshire , Scotland. "Robert I, The Bruce, was the 31st King of Scotland. He reigned from 1306 until 1 329." (KINGS AND QUEENS OF SCOTLAND by Eileen Dunlop and Anthony Kamm, 1984, page 5.)



OCCUPATION: Succeeded as Earl of Carrick 9 Nov 1292; crowned King of Scots (as Robert I) a t Scone, 15 Mar 1306. King 1306-1329. Seized Throne from Edward of England. Defeated Engli sh at Bannockburn 1314 to achieve Scottish Independence.

DEATH: William de St Clair, Bishop of Dunkeld, set out with Bruce's heart in a silver casket . Along with Sir James Douglas and two other knights, he was to bury the casket in Jerusalem . On reaching Andalusian in southern Spain, however, the party was confronted by the Mooris h cavalry. Seeing no way out, the four men charged the invincible foe and were duly slain . The Moors were nonetheless so impressed with the knights' courage that they return the cas ket to Scotland. Bruce's heart was later buried at Melrose Abbey, which is itself steeped i n Templar and Cistercian tradition.MISC: King of Scotland (1306-29), who freed Scotland fro m English rule, winning the decisive Battle of Bannockburn (1314) and ultimately confirming S cottish independence in the Treaty of Northampton (1328). Among the legends that later becam e attached to his name was the story that, when outlawed and hard pressed by the English, wit h his fortunes at low ebb, he derived hope and patience from watching a spider perseveringl y weave its web.

The Anglo-Norman family of Bruce, which had come to Scotland in the early 12th century, was r elated by marriage to the Scottish royal family, and hence the sixth Robert de Bruce (died 12 95), grandfather of the future king, claimed the throne when it was left vacant in 1290. Th e English king Edward I claimed feudal superiority over the Scots and awarded the crown to Jo hn de Balliol instead.

The eighth Robert de Bruce was born in 1274. His father, the seventh Robert de Bruce (died 13 04), resigned the title of earl of Carrick in his favour in 1292, but little else is known o f his career until 1306. In the confused period of rebellions against English rule from 129 5 to 1304 he appears at one time among the supporters of William Wallace, but he later appar ently regained Edward I's confidence. There is nothing at this period to suggest that he wa s later to be the Scottish leader in a war of independence against Edward's attempt to gover n Scotland directly.

The decisive event was the murder of John ("the Red") Comyn in the Franciscan church at Dumfr ies on Feb. 10, 1306, either by Bruce or his followers. Comyn, a nephew of John de Balliol, w as a possible rival for the crown, and Bruce's actions suggest that he had already decided t o seize the throne. He hastened to Scone and was crowned on March 25.

The new king's position was very difficult. Edward I, whose garrisons held many of the import ant castles in Scotland, regarded him as a traitor and made every effort to crush a movemen t that he treated as a rebellion. King Robert was twice defeated in 1306, at Methven, near Pe rth, on June 19, and at Dalry, near Tyndrum, Perthshire, on August 11. His wife and many of h is supporters were captured, and three of his brothers executed. The King himself became a fu gitive, hiding on the remote island of Rathlin off the north Irish coast.

In February 1307 he returned to Ayrshire. His main supporter at first was his only survivin g brother, Edward, but in the next few years he attracted a number of others. The King himsel f defeated John Comyn, earl of Buchan (a cousin of the slain John "the Red"), and in 1313 cap tured Perth, which had been in the hands of an English garrison; but much of the fighting wa s done by his supporters, who progressively conquered Galloway, Douglasdale, the forest of Se lkirk and most of the eastern borders, and finally, in 1314, Edinburgh. During these years th e King was helped by the support of some of the leading Scottish churchmen and also by the de ath of Edward I in 1307 and the ineptness of his successor, Edward II. The test came in 131 4 when a large English army attempted to relieve the garrison of Stirling. Its defeat at Bann ockburn on June 24 marked the triumph of Robert I.

Almost the whole of the rest of his reign had passed before he forced the English governmen t to recognize his position. Berwick was captured in 1318, and there were repeated raids int o the north of England, which inflicted great damage. Eventually, after the deposition of Edw ard II (1327), Edward III's regency government decided to make peace by the Treaty of Northa mpton (1328) on terms that included the recognition of Robert I's title as king of Scots an d the abandonment of all English claims to overlordship.

The King's main energies in the years after 1314, however, were devoted to settling the affai rs of his kingdom. Until the birth of the future king David II in 1324 he had no male heir, a nd two statutes, in 1315 and 1318, were concerned with the succession. In addition, a parliam ent in 1314 decreed that all who remained in the allegiance of the English should forfeit the ir lands; this decree provided the means to reward supporters, and there are many charters re granting the lands so forfeited. Sometimes these grants proved dangerous, for the King's chie f supporters became enormously powerful. James Douglas, knighted at Bannockburn, acquired imp ortant lands in the counties of Selkirk and Roxburgh that became the nucleus of the later pow er of the Douglas family on the borders. Robert I also had to restart the processes of roya l government, for administration had been more or less in abeyance since 1296. By the end o f the reign the system of exchequer audits was again functioning, and to this period belong s the earliest surviving roll of the register of the great seal.

In the last years of his life, Robert I suffered from ill health and spent most of this tim e at Cardross, Dumbartonshire, where he died. His body was buried in Dunfermline Abbey, but t he heart was removed on his instructions and taken by Sir James Douglas on a pilgrimage to th e Holy Land. Douglas was killed on the way (1330), but, according to one tradition of uncerta in value, the heart was recovered and brought back to Melrose Abbey. In later times Rober t I came to be revered as one of the heroes of Scottish national sentiment and legend.

Source: http://www.skybusiness.com/grahammac/history/History7.htmNotes from Sally Walmsle y [Geniedash@bigpond.com]:

Much of what has been written about Bruce is misleading. In addition to his being Earl of Ca rrick, Lord of Annandale and Keeper of the Royal Forests of Scotland, Bruce was Lord of the M anor of Huntingdon, owned a town house in London and a suburban manor in Tottenham. Two year s before the rising, his brother Alexander took his MA. at Cambridge. Bruce was no wild Scot tish chieftain, but an educated noble of Flemish extraction.

In 1306, the titular King of Scotland was John Baliol, a 'lamb among wolves' who had achieve d the throne through the backing of Edward of England and John Comyn of Badenoch, head of th e most powerful family in Scotland at that time. Baliol had fled to France with no intentio n of returning, leaving Scotland virtually kingless. Bruce had seemingly started planning hi s rising in 1304, but everything hinged upon the support of John Comyn, a difficult person: t he Red comyn must either support Bruce or be dead. The climax came in 1306, when Bruce met t he Comyn in Greyfriars church in Dumfries. As they stood before the alter and argued, knive s were drawn, and John Comyn fell wounded. According to legend, Bruce ran out of the church c rying 'I doubt I have slain the Red Comyn'. Kilpatrick answered his "Do you so doubt? Then I' ll mak siccar', and rushed into the church followed by Sir Robert Boyd and finished the job . Legendary as this may be, the fact is that both John Comyn of Badenoch and Sir Robert Comy n were both killed. This was the signal for Bruce's uprising to start. Bruce first went to h is castle at Lochmaben, and then to Glasgown to secure the Clyde for his supplies from Irelan d. Sir Robert Boyd took Rothesay castle from the sea, and laid siege to Inverkip. Six week s after the Comyn's death, Bruce was crowned King of Scotland at Scone.

Robert Bruce's reign was soon in trouble. Three months after he was crowned, he was defeate d by the English at Methven, and again near Tyndrum, and had to go into hiding, his queen an d daughter sent with the ladies of his supporters to Kildrummy castle in the charge of the ea rl of Athol, Alexander Lindsay and Sir Robert Boyd. The following year the king returned. D ouglas and Sir Robert Boyd led the attack on Arran from Kintrye, but their attack on Turnberr y castle, Bruce's own castle, failed. Bruce then raised his standard at Loch Trocl in Gallow ay, where he defeated an English force sent to capture him. He marched north to defeat the E nglish at Loudoun Hill, defeated John Comyn, Earl of Buchan, at Barrs Hill, and subdued the E arl of Ross. In c1308, Parliament was called at St Andrews and re-affirmed Bruce as King. D uring the next few years, Bruce consolidated his position, capturing all the English-held cas tles except Stirling, and repulsing an expedition of Edward II of England in 1310. The clima x came in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn, where Sir Robert Boyd was one of his principle c ommanders. 'Blind Harry' wrote of this battle:-

Ranged on the right the Southron legions stood,
And on this right the fiery Edward Bruce,
With him the experienced Boyd devides the sway,
Sent by the King to guide him through the day.ALIAS: Robert I The /Bruce/, King of Scotland

Notes from Sally Walmsley [Geniedash@bigpond.com]:

Much of what has been written about Bruce is misleading. In addition to his being Earl of Ca rrick, Lord of Annandale and Keeper of the Royal Forests of Scotland, Bruce was Lord of the M anor of Huntingdon, owned a town house in London and a suburban manor in Tottenham. Two year s before the rising, his brother Alexander took his MA. at Cambridge. Bruce was no wild Scot tish chieftain, but an educated noble of Flemish extraction.

In 1306, the titular King of Scotland was John Baliol, a 'lamb among wolves' who had achieve d the throne through the backing of Edward of England and John Comyn of Badenoch, head of th e most powerful family in Scotland at that time. Baliol had fled to France with no intentio n of returning, leaving Scotland virtually kingless. Bruce had seemingly started planning hi s rising in 1304, but everything hinged upon the support of John Comyn, a difficult person: t he Red comyn must either support Bruce or be dead. The climax came in 1306, when Bruce met t he Comyn in Greyfriars church in Dumfries. As they stood before the alter and argued, knive s were drawn, and John Comyn fell wounded. According to legend, Bruce ran out of the church c rying 'I doubt I have slain the Red Comyn'. Kilpatrick answered his "Do you so doubt? Then I' ll mak siccar', and rushed into the church followed by Sir Robert Boyd and finished the job . Legendary as this may be, the fact is that both John Comyn of Badenoch and Sir Robert Comy n were both killed. This was the signal for Bruce's uprising to start. Bruce first went to h is castle at Lochmaben, and then to Glasgown to secure the Clyde for his supplies from Irelan d. Sir Robert Boyd took Rothesay castle from the sea, and laid siege to Inverkip. Six week s after the Comyn's death, Bruce was crowned King of Scotland at Scone.

Robert Bruce's reign was soon in trouble. Three months after he was crowned, he was defeate d by the English at Methven, and again near Tyndrum, and had to go into hiding, his queen an d daughter sent with the ladies of his supporters to Kildrummy castle in the charge of the ea rl of Athol, Alexander Lindsay and Sir Robert Boyd. The following year the king returned. D ouglas and Sir Robert Boyd led the attack on Arran from Kintrye, but their attack on Turnberr y castle, Bruce's own castle, failed. Bruce then raised his standard at Loch Trocl in Gallow ay, where he defeated an English force sent to capture him. He marched north to defeat the E nglish at Loudoun Hill, defeated John Comyn, Earl of Buchan, at Barrs Hill, and subdued the E arl of Ross. In c1308, Parliament was called at St Andrews and re-affirmed Bruce as King. D uring the next few years, Bruce consolidated his position, capturing all the English-held cas tles except Stirling, and repulsing an expedition of Edward II of England in 1310. The clima x came in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn, where Sir Robert Boyd was one of his principle c ommanders. 'Blind Harry' wrote of this battle:-

Ranged on the right the Southron legions stood,
And on this right the fiery Edward Bruce,
With him the experienced Boyd devides the sway,
Sent by the King to guide him through the day.

Most of the information on Kings & Queens of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, England and other part s of the British Isles & Europe and on the various Royal & Noble families (and their off shoo ts) in this family tree has come from one or more of the following sources:BURKE'S Genealogic al and Heraldic Historyof the PEERAGE BARONETAGE AND KNIGHTAGE.
Edited by Peter Townend. Burke's Peerage Limited, London
"Burke's Peerage" popular name.

Also information from: Burke's Landed Gentry
Burke's Peerage Limited, London

Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage,
ISBN: 0312125577
Debrett's Peerage Ltd
86/88 Edgware Road
London W2 2YW
For further information on Debrett's
e-mail people@debretts.co.uk
Phone # +44 (0)171 916 9633.
http://www.debretts.co.uk/index.html

Directory of Royal Genealogical Data (Edinburgh Mirror)
http://www.tardis.ed.ac.uk/~bct/public/genealogy/royal/
Version: 29 Jul 99 Author: Brian TompsettBack:Royal and Noble genealogy Copyright (c) 199 4 - 1999This is part of Royal and Noble Genealogical Data on the Web at http://www.dcs.hull.a c.uk/public/genealogy/gedcom.html,

Royal Genealogies -- Menu
http://ftp.cac.psu.edu/~saw/royal/royalgen.html
Denis R. Reid
149 Kimrose Lane
Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147-1258
Internet Email address: ah189@cleveland.freenet.edu
(216) 237-5364
"Kings & Queens of Scotland". Eileen Dunlop & Anthony Kamm.1984. ISBN 0-86267-063-2 & ISB N 0 86267 055 1. Richard Drew Publishing Limited, 6 Clairmont Gardens, Glasgow G3 7LW"King s and Queens" Collins Gem. by David Lambert and Randal Gray. 1991. Harper Collins Publishers . PO Box Glasgow, G4 0NB. ISBN 0 00 458954 8A Diagram book first created by Diagram Visual In formation Limited of Kentish Town Road, London NW5 8SY"Britain's Kings and Queens" Sir Georg e Bellew, KCB,KCVO.Pitkin Pictorials Ltd. 1986, Northway Andover, Hants. SP10 5BEPrinted in G reat Britain by Garrod and Lofthouse international Limited, Bedford, Caterham,Crawley"Scotlan d's Kings and Queens" by Alan Bold. 1980 Pitkin Pictorials,11 Wyfold Road, London SW6 6SG Pri nted in Great Britain by Garrod and Lofthouse International Limited, Bedford, Caterham, Crawl ey "The Royal Line of Succession" The British Monarchy from Cerdic AD 534 to Queen Elizabet h II. Patrick W Montague-Smith, Late Editor, Debrett's PeeragePitkin Pictorials Ltd. 1986, No rthway Andover, Hants. SP10 5BEPrinted in Great Britain by Cedar Colour, Chandlers Ford, Hant s

Burke's possibly now published or distributed by
Almanach De Gotha Ltd,
9 Cork Street,Mayfair,
London, W1X 1PD
United Kingdom.
Tel (UK) 0181 404 2489
(International) +44(0) 181 404 2489
http://www.almanachdegotha.com

+ + + + + + + + Alternate name found in file: The_bruce

Most of the information on Kings & Queens of Scotland, Ireland, Wales, England and other part s of the British Isles & Europe and on the various Royal & Noble families (and their off shoo ts) in this family tree has come from one or more of the following sources:

BURKE'S Genealogical and Heraldic History of the PEERAGE BARONETAGE AND KNIGHTAGE.
Edited by Peter Townend. Burke's Peerage Limited, London
"Burke's Peerage" popular name.
----
Also information from
Burke's Landed Gentry
Burke's Peerage Limited, London
------
Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage,
ISBN: 0312125577
Debrett's Peerage Ltd
86/88 Edgware Road
London W2 2YW
For further information on Debrett's
e-mail people@debretts.co.uk
Phone # +44 (0)171 916 9633.
http://www.debretts.co.uk/index.html
-----
Directory of Royal Genealogical Data (Edinburgh Mirror)
http://www.tardis.ed.ac.uk/~bct/public/genealogy/royal/
Version: 29 Jul 99 Author: Brian TompsettBack: Royal and Noble genealogy Copyright (c) 199 4 - 1999This is part of Royal and Noble Genealogical Data on the Web at
http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/gedcom.html,
--------
Royal Genealogies -- Menu
http://ftp.cac.psu.edu/~saw/royal/royalgen.html
Denis R. Reid
149 Kimrose Lane
Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147-1258
Internet Email address: ah189@cleveland.freenet.edu
(216) 237-5364"Kings & Queens of Scotland". Eileen Dunlop & Anthony Kamm.1984. ISBN 0-86267-0 63-2 & ISBN 0 86267 055 1. Richard Drew Publishing Limited, 6 Clairmont Gardens, Glasgow G 3 7LW"Kings and Queens" Collins Gem. by David Lambert and Randal Gray. 1991. Harper Collins P ublishers. PO Box Glasgow, G4 0NB. ISBN 0 00 458954 8A Diagram book first created by Diagra m Visual Information Limited of Kentish Town Road, London NW5 8SY"Britain's Kings and Queens " Sir George Bellew, KCB,KCVO.Pitkin Pictorials Ltd. 1986, Northway Andover, Hants. SP10 5BE Printed in Great Britain by Garrod and Lofthouse international Limited, Bedford, Caterham,Cra wley"Scotland's Kings and Queens" by Alan Bold. 1980 Pitkin Pictorials,11 Wyfold Road, Londo n SW6 6SG Printed in Great Britain by Garrod and Lofthouse International Limited, Bedford, Ca terham, Crawley"The Royal Line of Succession" The British Monarchy from Cerdic AD 534 to Quee n Elizabeth II. Patrick W Montague-Smith, Late Editor, Debrett's PeeragePitkin Pictorials Ltd . 1986, Northway Andover, Hants. SP10 5BEPrinted in Great Britain by Cedar Colour, Chandler s Ford, Hants
---------
Burke's possibly now published or distributed by
Almanach De Gotha Ltd,
9 Cork Street,Mayfair,
London, W1X 1PD
United Kingdom.
Tel (UK) 0181 404 2489
(International) +44(0) 181 404 2489
http://www.almanachdegotha.com

+ + + + + + + + + 
King of Scotland, Robert de Bruce (I49689)
 
37





last mentioned in Bischmisheim in the fall of 1708. Went to England in the spring of 1709 and to New York early in 1710. They went to East Camp (near Germantown, NY) in the fall of 1710 and placed in the Queensberg settlement. On 16 Jul 1711 Matthias, with 40 men from Queensberg, volunteered for a military expedition against Canada. This expedition left Albany about August but retreated back to Albany on 1st October.

"Koon-Coons Families of New York" by William S. Coons. 
Kuntz, Matthias (I33312)
 
38





last mentioned in Bischmisheim in the fall of 1708. Went to England in the spring of 1709 and to New York early in 1710. They went to East Camp (near Germantown, NY) in the fall of 1710 and placed in the Queensberg settlement. On 16 Jul 1711 Matthias, with 40 men from Queensberg, volunteered for a military expedition against Canada. This expedition left Albany about August but retreated back to Albany on 1st October.

"Koon-Coons Families of New York" by William S. Coons. 
Kuntz, Matthias (I72979)
 
39





Simmendinger Register (1917) p.293: Niclaus Bohnenstiel (c) wife Margaratha and two children. (c) means settlement of Hunters Town (Ulster) Dutchess Co NY.

Kocherthal Church Record p.28, parents Johann Jacob Bohnenstihl and Anna Margaretha and one child named Susanna Margaretha.

Old Palatine Family by Traver, (Gen.R 974.72 R41sm) p.213 - The Bonesteel Family..

With Palatines to Dutchess Co (Ulster) NY in 1710.
Rick Ingersoll
Bohenstielen, Niclaus (I33327)
 
40





Simmendinger Register (1917) p.293: Niclaus Bohnenstiel (c) wife Margaratha and two children. (c) means settlement of Hunters Town (Ulster) Dutchess Co NY.

Kocherthal Church Record p.28, parents Johann Jacob Bohnenstihl and Anna Margaretha and one child named Susanna Margaretha.

Old Palatine Family by Traver, (Gen.R 974.72 R41sm) p.213 - The Bonesteel Family..

With Palatines to Dutchess Co (Ulster) NY in 1710.
Rick Ingersoll
Bohenstielen, Niclaus (I72998)
 
41





Title: The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States, by Gary Boyd Roberts, 1993
Page: 407
Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:56
Text: Gruffydd Maelor
Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:56 
POWYS, Gruffudd (Griffith) Ap Madog Prince of (I73306)
 
42





Title: The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States, by Gary Boyd Roberts, 1993
Page: 407
Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:56
Text: Gruffydd Maelor
Title: Complete Peerage of England Scotland Ireland Great Britain and the United Kingdom, by G. E Cokayne, Sutton Publishing Ltd, 2000
Page: XII/2:56 
Audley, Emma Of (I73307)
 
43





[001.ged]

Name Suffix: [SIR KNIGHT; BAR
Ancestral File Number: 84ZS-S0
Copyr ighted but use freely for your self and families
Not to be sent to for profit company's 
ZOUCHE, Alan (Sir) Baron of Ashby (I73248)
 
44




 
Bird, Richard (I269)
 
45




 
Mitchell, Joanne (I14882)
 
46




Ancestral File Number: 91NT-DX



Due to Email probelms since March, 2000, I may have missed your Email; it is important so please Email ulster@tns.net. Thanks for your patience.
I would appreciate any errors that you encounter and that you contact me immediately. Thanks for sharing freely! 
STEWART, Egidia (I77449)
 
47




Died of a dropsy-type illness. Others show her born 1314 in Hainault Belguim

please contact me with any corrections





Reference number Washington-23533.

Original individual @I12363@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I950@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@)

Source: Frederick Lewis Weis & Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr., Ancestral Roots of certain American colonists..., (Edition 7, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1992), 103-34. 
England, Philippa of Hainault - Queen of (I80037)
 
48




Line 7474 from GEDCOM File not recognizable or too long: TITL [SIR KNIGHT GUIENNE KING OF ARMS]/ Line 3402 from GEDCOM File not recognizable or too long: TITL [SIR KNIGHT GUIENNE KING OF ARMS]/ Line 7474 from GEDCOM File not recognizableor too long: TITL [SIR KNIGHT GUIENNE KING OF ARMS]/ Line 3402 from GEDCOM File not recognizable or too long: TITL [SIR KNIGHT GUIENNE KING OF ARMS]/ Line 6738 from GEDCOM File not recognizable or too long: TITL [SIR KNIGHT GUIENNE KINGOF ARMS]/

Sir Payn Roet was Guienne King of Arms.

please contact me with any corrections

Original individual @I32025@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I175@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@)

Original individual @I32025@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I45033@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) 
ROET, Sir Payne of Guienne (I68261)
 
49




Original individual @I15921@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I14656@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) 
Brewster, Mary (I12906)
 
50




Original individual @I15936@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) merged with @I14653@ (@MS_BIGGED.GED0@) 
Turner, Elisha Lieut. (I12920)
 

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